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  • Yooseung Jung

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    Women of Hwanggeumdong, 2019
    neon sign
    70 × 110 cm
    Courtesy of the artist


    The Square Unsubmerged, 2020
    printed publication
    25 × 25 cm
    Courtesy of the artist

     

    Women of Hwanggeum-dong concerns women who attended to the call box and provided anonymous support in the protests during Gwangju’s Democratization Movement. They were in charge of transporting water and food, and they even contributed their blood as a medical donation. But because of the stigma of prostitution, they were rendered silent demonstrators. The artist appropriates the official memorial form and the site of the injustice in Gwangju, and reflects on the democratic experience of these historically-marginalized demonstrators, using the textures of everyday elements like voices, objects, and memories.

    Jung’s new work for the exhibition focuses on the Democracy Plaza in Gwangju, where in the past countless people have repeatedly gathered and disbanded, causing conflicts and cracks, but also practicing harmony and ideals. According to the artist, “the fact that these crowds gathered in the Plaza already creates the landscape of May 18, 1980. The perception that a generation that did not experience May 18 is not qualified to discuss the topic defeats democratization, by regarding the history of May 18 exclusively. On the contrary, those that stand and sing in the square today are the afterimage of Democratization Movement.”

     

    Yooseung Jung (b. 1990, Gwangju, Korea) records her views about Gwangju’s sex workers in a variety of ways, including video, installations, and publications. She researches the history of sex workers and the spaces they gather in and their lives there. At the same time, she works on East Asian gender issues. Her solo exhibitions include YOOVELLEOCKJAM: Floating Surplus Youth (D.A.Aura, Gwangju, 2017) and group exhibitions include Perform 2019: Linkin-out (ACC, Gwangju, 2019), FINDING MYSELF IN TIME (Taipei Artist Village, Taipei, 2019) and Gwangju Biennale (2018).