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  • Christian Nyampeta

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    Christian Nyampeta in collaboration with Cooperative Cokkiri
    Scenes from the Revolution, 2020
    linoleum carvings, prints, display structures
    variable dimensions

    Christian Nyampeta
    The Landing between Us, 2020
    video
    approx. 20 min
    Courtesy of the artist

    Christian Nyampeta, Binna Choi, visitors
    A Dedication to the People’s Art School, 2020
    workstation, ink palette, ink, roller, paper
    variable dimensions
    Courtesy of the artists

     

    Drawing, carving, and printing made up the core curriculum at the People’s Art School, accompanied by field trips, plays, and group discussions. These practices were not only tools for dealing with painful memories but also ways to engage with the present, specially through the eyes of minor, more vulnerable people. Through Scenes from the Revolution Nyampeta “rematerializes” all the existing drawings by the school’s participants, enabling them to be reprinted, reused, and recirculated. Scenes from the Revolution exists in two versions. The one made for the Cologne iteration is a mobile version made of a selection of 72 images. The other one is more monumental in scale, and includes all the images created by Gwangju-based cooperative Cokkiri with their laser-cut utility.

    Christian Nyampeta‘s Scenes from the Revolution is based on the drawings of the lino prints by People’s Art School participants. The “home version” to be presented in Gwangju is created in cooperation with the Gwangju-based cooperative Cokkiri, which adapts and extends the version shown in Cologne.

    Insun Baeck, Yeongja Bae, Seungwon Chae, Gwanghui Cho, Hyanghun Cho, Hyeonjong Cho, Insuk Cho, Jieun Cho, Yeon-a Cho, Yeong-in Cho, Myeongsuk Choi, Sukhui Choi, Myeonghui Eun, Gemma, Gyeong-ok, Yunjeong Ha, Namsu Han, Miran Hong, Hyeonhwa, Nami Hwang, Eunhui Jeong, Eunju Jeong, Hyeongsu Jeong, Hye-ok Jeong, Hyeonju Jeong, Jin Jeong, Oknyeo Jeong, Sang-in Jeong, Seonhui Jeong, Sunhwa Jeong, Yong Jeong, Hakyeong Ju, Yeonghui Ju, Jun-gwang Kang, Myeong Kang, Yong-un Kang, Byeongsu Kim, Bokhui Kim, Eun-suk Kim, Gilsun Kim, Gyeong-ae Kim, Gyeongjin Kim, Gyeongrae Kim, Hyangnam Kim, Huijung Kim, Huikyeong Kim, Hyunja Kim, I-ho Kim, I-kyeong Kim, Inho Kim, Jeong-a Kim, Jeongmi Kim, Jeongsuk Kim, Jinseon Kim, Moran Kim, Migyeong Kim, Miseon Kim, Misuk Kim, Myeonghui Kim, Seongju Kim, Seongsong Kim, Seonjae Kim, Seonsuk Kim, Sucheol Kim, Sumi Kim, Sunrye Kim, Yong-in Kim, Yeongsuk Kim, Yukyeong Kim, Gyeong Ko, Suk-yeong Ko, Kyeong-ok, Cecilia Lee, Cheolseung Lee, Dongseop Lee, Eunsuk Lee, Gwangsuk Lee, Haesun Lee, Huisuk Lee, Jeongsuk Lee, Nam- ok Lee, Seonhui Lee, Seongja Lee, Seongju Lee, Seung-guk Lee, Yeongnim Lee, Yeonglim Lee, Gyeong-ok Lim, Jeonglim Lim, Jonghyeon Lim, Miri Lim, Myeongsuk Lim, Suhwa Lim, Yeonghui Lim, Miran, Misun, Gyeong-ok Na, Mira Na, Hyangra Nam, Hyang-ok No, Myeonghui No, Eun-il Oh, Insuk Oh, Byeong-guk Park, Byeong-gyu Park, Eun-a Park, Hyeonhwa Park, Jaehyeon Park, Jangcheol Park, Mamelta Park, Marta Park, Taesun Park, Yeongsuk Park, Yeon-ok Park, Jeongdu Pyo, Suhyeon Ryu, Yuhyeon Seo, Han-eol Seong, Hyeonsuk Shin, Jeongmi Shin, Mihyang Shin, Sunil Shin, Sihun, Siwon’s mother, Han-eol Song, Hyeonkyeong Song, Ilji Song, Jeomsuk Song, Miyeong Song, Stella, Taeksu, Hui-yu Yang, Songhui Yang, Yeonghye, Yeonja, Yong-a, Myeongran Yu, Sihun Yu, Sinjeong Yu, Euljin Yun, Huijeong Yun, Sunnam Won, Wonhui, and an anonymous collective work.

    The People’s Art School was organized at Gwangju Catholic Center, where participants were offered physical shelter, materials, facilities, and supplies. The oppression people experienced in Gwangju was often considered in comparison to the biblical suffering and martyrdom of Jesus Christ. Christian Nyampeta’s Christ’s Witness,
    A Woodprint by Eun-hee Jung of People’s Art School
    was placed on the front window of Köln’s Akademie der Künste der Welt during early lockdown, caused by COVID-19 in Germany.

     

    The Landing between Us is a modular playlist arranged by Christian Nyampeta for Gwangju Lessons. The playlist is composed of affections, alliances, appearances, material, and memories that exceed singular authorship, in the form of documents, dedications, elegies, film clips, photographs, presences, sonic sketches, and songs. Together they draw what one might call the researcher’s biography, the journey of engaging with Gwangju Lessons.

     

    A Dedication to the People’s Art School is composed of a working station and a library, and aims to trigger a more active learning situation that goes beyond spectatorship. It invites visitors to study the materials in more detail as well as to print the plates exhibited as part of the work Scenes from the Revolution, following their own choices. The visitors can then take the images home.

    At the Gwangju Lessons exhibition held in Cologne, this station also hosted Letters from Johannesburg conceived by the 2020 Cohort of Drawing and Contemporary Practice III at Wits School of Art. Convened by artist and educator Rangoato Hlasane, the 2020 Cohort of Drawing and Contemporary Practice III is formed of several ephemeral collectives. They have been engaging in the practice of letter writing, conceiving of it as a technology that helps shape the world by building bridges and envisioning the past, the present, and the future. For the exhibition in Cologne, the classroom took Gwangju as one of their addressees.

     

    Christian Nyampeta (b. 1981, Rwanda) is an artist working across art, design, and theory. His practice includes the convening of a roaming program of exhibitions, screenings and lyrical performances concerned with the question of how to live together through exploring the ideas of monument and translation. His latest projects include École du soir (Sculpture Center, New York, 2019), and A Flower Garden of All Kinds of Loveliness Without Sorrow (Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst (GfZK), Leipzig, 2019). Nyampeta also exhibited at the Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane (IMA, 2019) and Camden Arts Centre, London (2017). He participated in the 5th Ural Industrial Biennial of Contemporary Art, Ekaterinburg (2019), the Dakar Biennale (2018) and the 11th Gwangju Biennale (2016). Nyampeta runs Radius, an online and occasionally inhabitable radio station. He is a PhD student at the Visual Cultures Department of Goldsmiths, University of London. He was awarded The Art Prize Future of Europe 2019.